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Nubian Wellness

Wellness is a journey, not a destination! This blog was created to promote Fitness, Health, and Wellness as well as serving as an informational and inspirational source for Women and African-Americans!
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Because (potential) black love is far too beautiful to even fathom  the thought of competing, comparing, or co-existing. 

Please take the time to read as one of Nubian Wellness’ own writers shares her healthy living story and the how she lost 45 pounds. 

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

What is Diabetes?
Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high
levels of blood glucose (sugar) resulting from
defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both.
Essentially, diabetes means that your blood
glucose is too high. Your blood always has some
glucose in it because the body uses glucose for
energy; it’s the fuel that keeps you going. But too
much glucose in the blood is not good for your
health. Diabetes can lead to serious complications
and premature death, but people with diabetes can
take steps to control the disease and lower the risk
of complications.

Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — is one of the biggest health challenges facing African-Americans, and especially African-American women.

More Facts on Diabetes in African Americans:

  • 4.9 million, or 18.7 percent of all African Americans aged 20 years or older have diabetes.
  • African Americans are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes as non Hispanic whites.
  • One in 4 African-American women older than 55 has diabetes.
  • African-Americans also have high rates of at least two of diabetes’ most serious complications: amputation (such as having a toe or foot removed) and kidney failure.

Diabetes is a Family Affair                                                                   Diabetes is a challenging disease that affects
the entire family in many ways. So the National
Diabetes Education Program is encouraging
families and communities to take action by
participating in simple, but important lifestyle
changes to improve their health – particularly if
they have diabetes or are at risk for the disease.

For more information or to find find resources in your area visit the American Diabetes Association’s website: http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/programs/american-diabetes-month/

Before I Am My Sisters Keeper, I First Must Be KeptAs African American women it can be difficult to remember to take time for ourselves. I have watched many women become victim to the “super woman complex” and become so engulfed in helping others that they forget to take time for themselves. Firmly stated, you are only valuable as a vessel if you yourself are “full”. How can one truly be their sisters keeper if they do not take any time to take care of themselves first? Society or those around us may use pressure or guilt to make us believe that taking time for yourself is selfish but the truth of the matter is; making time to take care of yourself in mind,body, and spirit can actually be selfless. Running yourself and your patience thin trying to save everyone from every situation, isn’t honorable nor is allowing yourself to be used. I have listed 3 factors that I think are important to remember in regards to being your Sisters Keeper! 3 things to remember:1. ) It’s okay to say “No”. Stop thinking that you have to be able to do everything for everyone all the time. Sometimes you just don’t have the means financially or as far as time is concerned to help individuals out. 2.) Schedule time for yourself. I have learned the importance of  ”ME Time”. I turn my phone on Airplane mode and turn off all email notifications for this time period. I do something relaxing or reflective for myself and don’t allow anyone or anything to interrupt my time. It can be as simple as reading a book, getting a pedicure, going to a movie alone, etc. You will decide what works best for you and the best place for you to go to achieve complete serenity and stillness for your mind to regroup. 3.) Learn the difference between “Service” and “Silliness”Being an individual who has dedicated my life to the service of others, I think it is important to realize that some people just don’t have your best interest in mind. You have to be able to differentiate between actually serving others by helping them become independently successful versus being silly by making yourself a crutch for people to constantly become dependent on you. You are not a Lifesaver and should not constantly be in “Emergency Mode” unless you are a paramedic or an ER doctor. Be wary of individuals who call you only when they need you or need something. These types of relationships are crippling and will drain the life out of you. 
Everyone that comes into your life is either an asset or a liability. It’s a recession so don’t feel bad about getting rid of your liabilities. 
Written By: Kimi Walker

Before I Am My Sisters Keeper, I First Must Be Kept

As African American women it can be difficult to remember to take time for ourselves. I have watched many women become victim to the “super woman complex” and become so engulfed in helping others that they forget to take time for themselves. 

Firmly stated, you are only valuable as a vessel if you yourself are “full”. How can one truly be their sisters keeper if they do not take any time to take care of themselves first? Society or those around us may use pressure or guilt to make us believe that taking time for yourself is selfish but the truth of the matter is; making time to take care of yourself in mind,body, and spirit can actually be selfless. Running yourself and your patience thin trying to save everyone from every situation, isn’t honorable nor is allowing yourself to be used. I have listed 3 factors that I think are important to remember in regards to being your Sisters Keeper! 

3 things to remember:

1. ) It’s okay to say “No”. 
Stop thinking that you have to be able to do everything for everyone all the time. Sometimes you just don’t have the means financially or as far as time is concerned to help individuals out. 

2.) Schedule time for yourself. 
I have learned the importance of  ”ME Time”. I turn my phone on Airplane mode and turn off all email notifications for this time period. I do something relaxing or reflective for myself and don’t allow anyone or anything to interrupt my time. It can be as simple as reading a book, getting a pedicure, going to a movie alone, etc. You will decide what works best for you and the best place for you to go to achieve complete serenity and stillness for your mind to regroup. 

3.) Learn the difference between “Service” and “Silliness”
Being an individual who has dedicated my life to the service of others, I think it is important to realize that some people just don’t have your best interest in mind. You have to be able to differentiate between actually serving others by helping them become independently successful versus being silly by making yourself a crutch for people to constantly become dependent on you. You are not a Lifesaver and should not constantly be in “Emergency Mode” unless you are a paramedic or an ER doctor. Be wary of individuals who call you only when they need you or need something. These types of relationships are crippling and will drain the life out of you.

Everyone that comes into your life is either an asset or a liability. It’s a recession so don’t feel bad about getting rid of your liabilities. 

Written By: Kimi Walker